New York Times Books

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“After the women in ‘Elsewhere’ vanish — or do they? — there is no kerfuffle, only silence.” nyti.ms/3y3rPh0
5h
A Portuguese novelist helps you get to know Lisbon, whose "streets are rich with literary tradition." nyti.ms/3bDQ7Xm
5h
We spoke to Blitz Bazawule, an artist and filmmaker who just published his first novel, “The Scent of Burnt Flowers.” nyti.ms/3bruzgm
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Our critic @jenszalai reads Justice Stephen Breyer’s “undeniably ironic” most recent book in light of recent Supreme Court decisions. nyti.ms/3I5N6eG
6h
Carlene Bauer’s novel begins as an ode to the alchemy that occurs when two strangers find their sensibilities and tastes to be miraculously congruent. But the reader knows from Page 1 this epic friendship will end. @MollyYoung reviews. nyti.ms/3y7oCNi
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Of course, “these tensions need no resolution,” our reviewer Yoon Choi writes. “We yearn for individuality even as we yearn to belong — generating anxiety, but also comedy.” nyti.ms/3R8BoEa
7h
For years the heroines of this novel romp through New York, drinking spiked iced tea at Jones Beach and stalking Lou Reed, gathering material to build out their identities like wrens accumulating twigs for a nest. Then there is a rift. @MollyYoung reviews. nyti.ms/3nqGU7n
8h
Lincoln was, of course, a person who lived and loved and grieved like any other — and like his assassin, John Wilkes Booth, found perhaps some solace in the prospect of an afterworld. nyti.ms/3ysMRa8
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Let us help you read your way through Lisbon. An award-winning Portuguese novelist recommends books to help you get to know Portugal’s vibrant capital, and spots to read them if you go. nyti.ms/3y64NpO
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NEW DATE: What makes a great summer book? Join our journalists @heyitsfranklin2, @LizEgan and @sarahlyall tomorrow at 12pm ET for a discussion about summer reading and which books, new and old, to add to your reading list. twitter.com/i/spaces/1BdGY…
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25 titles that have shaped LGBTQ writing. nyti.ms/3OGU7EK
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“Rendering an apt metaphor for the invisibility and loss of identity felt by many new mothers,” Marie-Helene Bertino writes, “‘Elsewhere’ sees them forgotten completely.” nyti.ms/3ORxhdG
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Carlene Bauer’s novel begins as an ode to the alchemy that occurs when two strangers find their sensibilities and tastes to be miraculously congruent. But the reader knows from Page 1 this epic friendship will end. @MollyYoung reviews. nyti.ms/3QTVf9M
10h
“Who better to identify why his fellow Republicans got sucked under than someone who kept getting pulled back in?” @jenszalai reviews “Why We Did It: A Travelogue From the Republican Road to Hell.” nyti.ms/3Ov2TG1
11h
Davey Davis’s new novel “X” is “lyrical and nonlinear, with sentences that feel like carved obsidian: dark, sharp and shiny,” Hugh Ryan writes. nyti.ms/3nkqe1i
11h
“‘Thrust’ is an indignant and impressive novel, but only in spurts an enjoyable one, and maybe that’s exactly the point,” says our critic @AlexandraJacobs. nyti.ms/3np2UQ4
12h
A selection of books published this week, from Yan Lianke to Hurricane Maria. nyti.ms/3ypfVzo
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In Caitlin Macy’s “A Blind Corner,” Yoon Choi writes, “a sporty mom is psyched to find that her friend has “ketones in her urine.” nyti.ms/3OGxq3G
“So,” a narrator thinks as he cares for his aging and horny father, who suffers from dementia. “This was to be our Sisyphean hell — me coming out to my fading father every day for the rest of his life.” nyti.ms/3u8EDkO
“Who needs a romantic partner when you have a best friend? Who needs a diary when you have a living, breathing receptacle for every opinion?” @MollyYoung reviews Carlene Bauer’s novel “Girls They Write Songs About.” nyti.ms/3u94NEk
“As in ‘Alice in Wonderland’ or an old-fashioned Disney cartoon, things perk up considerably in Lidia Yuknavitch’s willfully difficult new novel, ‘Thrust,’ when the animals talk.” Our critic @AlexandraJacobs reviews. nyti.ms/3yr70xu
“X” documents a dystopia that has only just arrived, suggesting that perhaps there was a moment when we could have taken a different path. nyti.ms/39XmsI5
From “The Vagina Monologues” to “The End of Eddy,” here are 25 works that have shaped LGBTQ literature. nyti.ms/3QVjWCH
“After the women in ‘Elsewhere’ vanish — or do they? — there is no kerfuffle, only silence.” nyti.ms/3OQa4Iz
In Nikki Erlick’s debut novel, “The Measure,” adults around the world receive a mysterious box containing a length of string that indicates how long they will live. nyti.ms/3I1Ag0F
Queer romance is booming. “People want to see themselves,” said a bookstore manager. “Customers will come in and say, ‘I just want something that’s gay and happy.’ And I’m like, ‘I have ten different options for you.’” nyti.ms/3OzmjKc
In “Ways of Being,” the technologist and philosopher James Bridle explores different forms of intelligence. As in postapocalyptic fiction, Bridle’s landscape belongs simultaneously to our ravaged future and our mythic past. nyti.ms/3OuqZAX
Davey Davis’s new novel is a queer noir set in a near-future world full of inexplicable violence, “exported” undesirables and an encyclopedia’s worth of sexual deviance. nyti.ms/3OnKknc
In Alyssa Songsiridej’s debut, “Little Rabbit,” sex turns into consensual violence, which in turn morphs into something like love. nyti.ms/3xPDOPe
10 visual books commemorating a culture of resistance and resilience in the queer community. nyti.ms/3OvRuFW
In Tomi Obaro’s “Dele Weds Destiny,” three very different women’s friendship evolves from their 1980s college days to their varied adult lives. Our reviewer calls the debut novel “loving and lively.” nyti.ms/3bDA2B6
I wrote about the ongoing saga of environmental injustice in Flint, as told through photographs by LaToya Ruby Frazier nytimes.com/2022/06/24/boo…
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In her ninth book, “The Colony,” a veteran journalist takes readers across the border to a patriarchal society where women are treated terribly. nyti.ms/3OIDvfR
25 titles that have shaped LGBTQ writing. nyti.ms/39XlOdL
The darkest parts of “X” are what the novel suggests about our present, our reviewer writes. nyti.ms/3OlxaHn
For years the heroines of this novel romp through New York, drinking spiked iced tea at Jones Beach and stalking Lou Reed, gathering material to build out their identities like wrens accumulating twigs for a nest. Then there is a rift. @MollyYoung reviews. nyti.ms/3ngFJqS
Lincoln was, of course, a person who lived and loved and grieved like any other — and like his assassin, John Wilkes Booth, found perhaps some solace in the prospect of an afterworld. nyti.ms/3HVCqik
“I'd Like To Play Alone, Please,” a collection of comedic stories by Tom Segura, joins the combined print and e-book nonfiction best-seller list. nyti.ms/39NUuyC
“I could no longer idly stand by and wait for the government to do its job,” Frazier writes. nyti.ms/3NiKLxT
LGBTQ romance novels have been around for decades, but they have been a quiet presence, almost entirely self-published or put out by small presses. Now sales have surged with help from the biggest publishers and mainstream retailers. nyti.ms/3OJJkd0
More picture-book animal antics from the creators of “Olivia,” “Monkey on the Run” and “Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?” — among other artful standouts. nyti.ms/3NlpNOR
Blitz Bazawule, an artist and filmmaker who was born in Ghana and is directing a new version of “The Color Purple,” is publishing his first novel, “The Scent of Burnt Flowers.” nyti.ms/3HQNnSz
In her new story collection, “Life Ceremony,” the Japanese writer Sayaka Murata examines the intersections where extremes meet. nyti.ms/3QQ2wHE
“You are beautiful, and in America, kissing is ugly.” nyti.ms/3a2z0Ol
“Maybe the worst part about growing up in public housing is that people think your body is public too,” Fe Fe says in Toya Wolfe’s “The Last Summer on State Street.” nyti.ms/3QPykfN
In Caitlin Macy’s “A Blind Corner,” Yoon Choi writes, “a sporty mom is psyched to find that her friend has “ketones in her urine.” nyti.ms/3xTDGxU
“This water won’t kill you,” Shea Cobb’s father texted her from their ancestral home in Mississippi. “Come home.” nyti.ms/39SeY9h
James Beard once said he could probably be a cannibal if he had enough tarragon. In Sayaka Murata’s new story collection, “Life Ceremony,” the dead are stewed and served up hot-pot style. nyti.ms/3No1DU2
Baxter Black, the country’s best-known cowboy poet, whose witty, big-hearted verse about cowpokes, feed lots and wide-open vistas elevated the tradition of Western doggerel to something of a folk art, has died at 77. nyti.ms/3A1FVlz
“So,” a narrator thinks as he cares for his aging and horny father, who suffers from dementia. “This was to be our Sisyphean hell — me coming out to my fading father every day for the rest of his life.” nyti.ms/3HP8OTU
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