National Geographic

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A cosmic storm in A.D. 993 released a pulse of radiation so powerful that it was recorded in the rings of the world’s trees. That solar event helps pinpoint the year the Vikings were present in the Americas on.natgeo.com/3LVslCB
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One of the best ways to turn the tide on the ocean crisis? Teach kids about the creatures that live in it on.natgeo.com/3zk0olt
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New observations suggest those galaxies could be part of a string of similarly bizarre objects—the debris from a galactic smashup that may have occurred some eight billion years ago on.natgeo.com/3MVFtce
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A remote mountain monastery reveals the earthly yearnings behind our quest for utopias such as Shangri-La on.natgeo.com/3wQIeWI
Now Streaming on @disneyplus, #WeFeedPeople follows chef José Andrés and his nonprofit World Central Kitchen’s incredible mission and evolution over 12 years on.natgeo.com/38mDHBO
Renewable energy is critically needed to fight climate change, but some environmentalists worry that rapid buildout without careful siting could endanger threatened species on.natgeo.com/3lNPbS0
Pando, a huge aspen grove in Utah, is a single organism that’s lived for millennia. Unchecked grazing is destroying it on.natgeo.com/3POxqQr
Twilight casts an amber glow over Utah's Canyonlands National Park in this striking scene by photographer Bruce Dale
Here’s how the iconic monument, now celebrating its centennial, made its way from a Massachusetts artist colony to the National Mall on.natgeo.com/3MRVBLW
In today’s newsletter, we explore whether galaxies can survive without dark matter, spy on the world of owls, and explain the complexities of animal camouflage on.natgeo.com/3LQ1ZBV
The 95-million-year-old fossil has paleontologists wondering if other ancient sharks could have also had peculiar body shapes on.natgeo.com/3MWn2E8
Examining his own Japanese identity, photographer Ryotaro Horiuchi turned to annual festivals throughout the country for samurai descendants and devotees on.natgeo.com/3t1BLWF
Renewable energy is critically needed to fight climate change, but some environmentalists worry that rapid buildout without careful siting could endanger threatened species on.natgeo.com/3lOA6Qc
Falling prices, rising costs, and anti-fur sentiment are endangering a way of life that has sustained the Indigenous people of northern Canada for hundreds of years on.natgeo.com/3z3izvo
Monkeypox, unlike COVID-19 which circulates via tiny air-borne droplets, doesn’t spread so easily. “Transmission is really happening from close physical contact, skin-to-skin contact.” on.natgeo.com/3apRpVj
In the landmark Supreme Court case Korematsu v. U.S., the civil rights icon challenged the order that created internment camps—and lost. Here's why the case remains significant today on.natgeo.com/38PH04E
Read more about neuroengineering explorers and real science fiction-ish possibilities—the elaborate system at work inside your own fingertips—in our June issue. on.natgeo.com/3wLyKMh
And when you factor in long-distance signaling, sensory receptor gloves, and 21st century robotics, things get really weird. Did my own hand, while I sat in a Cleveland lab, feel the touch of a hand in Los Angeles? I'm still trying to figure that out.
The experimental surgeries are changing the lives of research volunteers like Brandon, or this car crash survivor we met in a lab at the University of Chicago. That pedestal in Scott Imbrie’s head, and the implant beneath it, are restoring his scrambled perception of touch.
I'm awed (OK, kind of obsessed) by what we learned about the touch receptors all over our skin, constantly shooting signals the brain sorts into crucial info. We met researchers working to replicate this sensation with implants, wiring, and bionic prostheses.
We learned how wrong those experts were—as that baby rhesus monkey experiment helped prove. Scientists have used monkeys, rats & humans to measure the real effects of touch on brain chemistry, pain sensation, heart rate, respiration, resistance to infection.
We learned that a famous, disturbing 20th century psychology experiment was conducted because child experts were urging parents NOT to caress and hold their babies. Too much affectionate touch, they insisted, would lead to unfit children. on.natgeo.com/3MWEFDV
Touch is the most primal sense, Lynn and I learned—and the earliest to develop in the womb. We learned that when medically fragile newborns are laid against their mothers' bare chests just after birth, this skin-to-skin contact can save babies' lives.
It was during the first COVID quarantine that I began wondering exactly why six feet apart was so hard for so many of us. What happens in the skin and brain during physical contact with others? Why did I keep thinking about that last time I'd clasped a friend's hand?
Now, implanted wires poke out through his left shoulder. Listening to Brandon describe what has happened to him in the neuroengineering experiments was part of an astonishing months-long journey, for Lynn and me, into the complexity and power of human touch.
After his accident and amputation, Brandon Prestwood had spiraled into depression. Then he met neuroscientists experimenting with a technique that might let him feel, as though in his missing limb, the touch of his wife's hand. on.natgeo.com/3wLyKMh
Hello! I'm @reporteracg, and as photographer Lynn Johnson and I researched our June cover story on the science of human touch, we met an unforgettable man who'd lost his left hand. He wanted something that might seem nonsensical at first...
In Tasmania, the swift parrot population is being decimated by sugar gliders
An outbreak of monkeypox has public health officials concerned. But the virus can be contained with vaccines that are already stockpiled and available in some countries on.natgeo.com/3acynBx
Since it was unveiled to the public on Memorial Day in 1922, the Lincoln Memorial has become one of the world’s best-known monuments—and a key stop for millions of annual visitors to Washington, D.C. on.natgeo.com/3wQfiNd
A remote mountain monastery reveals the earthly yearnings behind our quest for utopias such as Shangri-La on.natgeo.com/38plzYc
"Seeing these fireflies for the first time is magical. The entire forest is flashing together in unison." on.natgeo.com/38OcWGJ
As cold-water lakes, rivers, and streams around the world heat up, many fish will be in trouble—which means fishing will be in trouble too on.natgeo.com/3N1Q9py
Associated with rebirth, Dionysus shaped religious practices across the Mediterranean until the dawn of Christianity on.natgeo.com/3z3fA67
Troubling current events can be upsetting and confusing to children. Here’s how to talk to kids to help them cope on.natgeo.com/3GhIBwo
The Goblin Shark has a unique set of jaws for catching prey
In 2020, the world’s highest weather station went dark. Now, members of a @InsideNatGeo-led expedition have deployed a new, improved version atop the roof of the world. The Perpetual Planet Everest Expedition was supported by Rolex on.natgeo.com/3lK7E1H
New observations suggest those galaxies could be part of a string of similarly bizarre objects—the debris from a galactic smashup that may have occurred some eight billion years ago on.natgeo.com/3sU5LUo
In “The World’s Borough,” what happens in Queens, New York has ripple effects worldwide. One of the hardest-hit areas in the early days of the coronavirus outbreak, this “epicenter of the epicenter” affected one of the most culturally diverse neighborhoods in the world.
Retweeted by National Geographic
An expedition team treks to Everest Base Camp in Nepal in this scene captured by photographer Brittany Mumma
Even when it’s just a little warmer than usual, higher night temperatures mess with our slumber. A new worldwide study adds up these losses on.natgeo.com/3LG15Ih
“The energy and the power that the waves have is something from another world, it’s magic.” on.natgeo.com/3wJUGaC
Although their ancient splendors disappeared from sight, archaeology is now revealing their glorious pasts on.natgeo.com/3wJAghV
“This is a fearless, five-gram salamander that climbs the tallest trees on Earth and isn’t afraid to take a leap of faith.” on.natgeo.com/3MDRvXz
Here’s how the holiday got started and why it has sparked debate throughout its history on.natgeo.com/3LKfh2W
In 2019 Jessica Nabongo became the first documented Black woman to travel to every country in the world. On the latest episode of #OverheardNatGeo, she shares how globe-trotting changed the way she sees the world and humanity on.natgeo.com/3yWvq2l
Today’s travelers should embrace humility, says Jessica Nabongo, instead of going to faraway places to confirm what they think they already know on.natgeo.com/3yS9rtu
Sanctions on Russia, bad weather, and export cuts have fueled a severe fertilizer shortage that has farmers scrambling to keep the world fed on.natgeo.com/3GdZ1pD
Our long physical separations, in fear of COVID-19, reinforced what scientists already believed: that our close connections with others keep us healthy on.natgeo.com/3lFfkCx
Here’s how the so-called “Wizard of Menlo Park” achieved such an outsized reputation—and why he is still known as one of the greatest inventors of all time on.natgeo.com/3wKsp2v
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