Merriam-Webster

All Photos Twitter.com
An #etymology hiding in plain sight: INFATUATE [Latin 'in-' ("into," "toward") + 'fatuus' ("foolish," "fatuous")] Being 'infatuated' literally means "made foolish" by something (or, to put it another way, "crazy about" something).
An #etymology hiding in plain sight: DISEASE [Middle French 'dis-' ("opposite or absence of") + ease ("comfort")] A 'disease' is literally "lack of comfort" or a state of wellness. merriam-webster.com/dictionary/dis…
Sometimes the #etymology of a word is hiding in plain sight. The word's parts outline its meaning. Take ENORMOUS: [Latin 'e-' ("out of") + norm] Something 'enormous' is literally "outside of the norm" in terms of size. merriam-webster.com/dictionary/eno…
Can you say 'polyphiloprogenitive' five times really fast? Here's a list of unusually long English words. merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/…
'Casket' originally referred to an ornamental box for jewelry or other valuables. The use of the term for a burial container took hold only after undertaking began to flourish as a profession in the 19th century. merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/…
On #ScienceDiction, @MerriamWebster lexicographers Emily Brewster and Peter Sokolowski explain the mistake-ridden origins of our words, how language evolves, and how wrong becomes right. sciencefriday.com/articles/langu…
Retweeted by Merriam-Webster
This week on Word Matters: the ins and outs of subject-verb agreement! Join us as we try to untangle whether it's "a parade of revelers is approaching" or "a parade of revelers are approaching" (and other tricky ones like that). digital.nepr.net/podcasthub/wor…
'Flagrant' comes from the Latin 'flagrare' (“to burn”), with the original English meaning of "fiery hot; burning." merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/…
'Resign' is typically the choice in formal settings and in conjunction with phrases such as "in disgrace." merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/…
Today in Uncommon Portmanteaus: 'Squdgy': squat + pudgy merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/…
'Chthonic': of or relating to the underworld 'Squush': to squash or crush (something) 'Zugzwang': the necessity of moving in chess when it is to one's disadvantage merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/…
"We perceive by means of the kaleidoscopic mirror of this life. This means that our ability to perceive is at once tyrannized by our expectations, and at war with them." — James Baldwin, The Evidence of Things Not Seen, 1985 #JamesBaldwin cited on M-W: merriam-webster.com/dictionary/per…
Everything you need to know about how, why, and when 'y' acts like a vowel: merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/…
This week on Word Matters, we're joined by @scifri's Johanna and Chris to discuss the clinical origins of a word that dictionary editors understand well. It's the invention of 'introvert.' digital.nepr.net/podcasthub/wor…
Retweeted by Merriam-Webster
This week on Word Matters, we're joined by @scifri's Johanna and Chris to discuss the clinical origins of a word that dictionary editors understand well. It's the invention of 'introvert.' digital.nepr.net/podcasthub/wor…
'Allusion': 🔀 an implied or indirect reference 'Illusion': 🪄 a misleading image presented to the visiomerriam-webster.com/words-at-play/…D1
Join us tomorrow night for a chat with the great Maira Kalman! Register here: britannica.zoom.us/webinar/regist…
'Pulchritudinous': physically beautiful 'Omphaloskepsis': contemplation of one's navel as an aid to meditation 'Tergiversation': evasion of straightforward action or clear-cut statement merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/…
Shakespeare used these words, that's for sure. Did he create them? Not so much. merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/…
'Errant': 🗺 traveling or straying outside the proper bounds 'Arrant': 👎 being of the worst kinmerriam-webster.com/words-at-play/…Am
The English word 'chaos' is borrowed from the Greek word that means "abyss." merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/…
It's one month. How hard could it be to remember? merriam-webster.com/word-games/jul…
This week on Word Matters: dog whistles and card games! Including - how the political use of 'dog whistle' came about - the surprisingly recent coinage of 'wild card' - a noble attempt to raise the profile of euchre through vocab digital.nepr.net/podcasthub/wor…
Retweeted by Merriam-Webster
Among this week's notable lookups: astronaut HIPAA nope altar call merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/…
Twiends™ uses the Twitter™ API, displays it's logo & trademarks, and is not endorsed or certified by them. These items remain the property of Twitter. We do not sell followers, we only provide display advertising. Bots & fake accounts are not permitted on twiends. © 2009
Grow Your Twitter Free
Want To Grow Your Twitter?
We help other people find and follow you on Twitter.
Key Info:
Started in 2009
Over 6 million signups
Country targeting provided
We never auto tweet to your timeline
We never auto follow others
We actively moderate our community
Please Share
Please upgrade your browser  chrome