Freakonomics

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“The real world doesn’t quite work the way the theory does,” says @WhiteHouseCEA chair @CeciliaERouse. “The winners have not been compensating the losers so we’ve had an increasing concentration of winners and the losers just keep falling further behind.” freak.ws/3gAq2bS
No, I am waiting until the interview itself to watch the Euros :-) twitter.com/R_Thaler/statu…
.@WhiteHouseCEA chair @CeciliaERouse shares one way her thinking has evolved through her career: “I think we’ve overemphasized efficiency over just helping people. ” Listen for the full story: freak.ws/3q1ZuDp
Need your input, please. Have you ever read "Nudge" by Thaler/Sunstein (or meant to read it)? We are interviewing @R_Thaler for the Freakonomics Radio Book Club: what questions would you like to hear answered?
This week, Stephen asks @CeciliaERouse, chair of the @WhiteHouseCEA, some BIG questions. Like why is @JoeBiden doing his best F.D.R. impression? And what does this moment look like in the arc of history? Listen to their full conversation now: freak.ws/35xrl50
On this week’s episode, @WhiteHouseCEA chair @CeciliaERouse tries to convince us that the Biden Administration’s expansive and expensive programs are a very good use of taxpayer dollars. “This is not big government for big government’s sake.” Listen now: freak.ws/3vA5lku
“So what are your best ideas for reconciling the growth of automation and technology with the potential for massive job loss?” On this week’s episode, hear Stephen pick the brain of @WhiteHouseCEA chair @CeciliaERouse: freak.ws/3gzjom1
.@WhiteHouseCEA chair @CeciliaERouse shares one way her thinking has evolved through her career: “I think we’ve overemphasized efficiency over just helping people. ” Listen for the full story: freak.ws/3iMUFfo
“The real world doesn’t quite work the way the theory does,” says @WhiteHouseCEA chair @CeciliaERouse. “The winners have not been compensating the losers so we’ve had an increasing concentration of winners and the losers just keep falling further behind.” freak.ws/3wFjq1i
.@CeciliaERouse, chair of the @WhiteHouseCEA, explains why @POTUS Biden wants to spend trillions of dollars to reshape the economy, and why — as the first Black chair of the C.E.A. — she has a good idea of what needs fixing. freak.ws/3q1D5WO
“Pirates developed their system of constitutional democracy, which looks so much like our own, more than half a century before America's founding fathers put pen to paper.” — economist Pete Leeson. Hear the full story on this week’s episode now: freak.ws/3pQLCM4
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She’s From the Government, and She’s Here to Help. This week on Freakonomics Radio: freak.ws/3xs7lwr
Here you go, friend: bit.ly/3vvFvxT Also, you might find this helpful: bit.ly/3vsBWZq twitter.com/CryptoHawker_/…
What can supermarket pricing tactics teach us about which patients get cardiac surgery? Why are kids with summer birthdays less likely to get flu shots? @AnupamBJena will explore questions like these in his new podcast. Catch the pilot now: freak.ws/3v5zwjj
This week, @angeladuckw critiques her own kind: “Contemporary academic writing is often shockingly bad. Even scientists have written about how bad scientific writing is.” Hear why she and Stephen think that’s the case — and what should be done about it: freak.ws/3xphdqR
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“I think that there are only economic answers to social questions,” says Pete Leeson. “I have one tattoo on my right biceps that I got when I was a teenager, which is a supply and demand curve with a demand curve shifting to the right.” Listen now: freak.ws/3znuMZz
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Marathons can block city roads for miles — including routes to hospitals. Economist/physician @AnupamBJena wondered: Does living near a marathon route make it more likely that you’d die if you had a heart attack on the day of a race? Find out now: freak.ws/3vaovNI
This week on our spinoff show @NSQ_Show: Why is academic writing so bad? Also: what does your perfect day look like? freak.ws/2U4ZUNn
.@AnupamBJena estimates that around 10-20 people in the world have both an M.D. and a Ph.D. in economics. How many of *those* people host a podcast? As of last week, at least one. Check out Bapu’s new Freakonomics Radio Network show now: freak.ws/3cyFJO5
On the scale of scholarly weirdness, @StevenDLevitt can't even begin to compete with Pete Leeson. Pete takes seemingly nonsensical practices and — through a brilliant mix of history, data, and economic thinking — shows they actually make a lot of sense. freak.ws/3pK5Bw1
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.@AnupamBJena was already a double threat: a doctor and an economist. Now he’s a podcast host too. In this sneak preview of the Freakonomics Radio Network’s newest show, Bapu discovers that marathons can be deadly — but not for the reasons you may think. freak.ws/3ixuQji
What can supermarket pricing tactics teach us about which patients get cardiac surgery? Why are kids with summer birthdays less likely to get flu shots? @AnupamBJena will explore questions like these in his new podcast. Catch the pilot now: freak.ws/2TbvSXL
The day of his wife’s first 5K race, @AnupamBJena planned to park in his spot at Mass General to cheer her on. But the race completely cut him off from the hospital. The experience sparked the idea for new research. Listen now to hear about it: freak.ws/3pD8qyK
Marathons can block city roads for miles — including routes to hospitals. Economist/physician @AnupamBJena wondered: Does living near a marathon route make it more likely that you’d die if you had a heart attack on the day of a race? Find out now: freak.ws/3ivY429
.@AnupamBJena estimates that around 10-20 people in the world have both an M.D. and a Ph.D. in economics. How many of *those* people host a podcast? As of this week, at least one. Check out Bapu’s new Freakonomics Radio Network show now: freak.ws/3wod8CU
.@AnupamBJena was already a double threat: a doctor and an economist. Now he’s a podcast host too. In this sneak preview of the Freakonomics Radio Network’s newest show, Bapu discovers that marathons can be deadly — but not for the reasons you may think. freak.ws/3pJE8dF
“We can do better. After over 60 years of doing the same thing and given the counterfactual evidence that we see elsewhere, it just seems to me somewhat foolhardy that we keep going down this route of systemic aid.” — @dambisamoyo on this week’s ep freak.ws/3fWyqBP
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Introducing a New “Freakonomics of Medicine” Podcast. This week on Freakonomics Radio: freak.ws/3iwpEMB
Stephen’s prediction for a lasting impact of the pandemic? “The underlying technology of the vaccines may become a medical technology in many more arenas having nothing to do with viruses that will save many more lives than the pandemic took.” freak.ws/3z28wo1
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“Working at home is always less productive than working in the office. Always.” — Morris Davis, @RutgersBSchool professor. Do you agree? Listen to this week’s episode for more: freak.ws/3g8XODt
This week, a listener asked @StevenDLevitt if we should have lotteries to incentivize people to get vaccinated, writing that “it doesn't feel right.” Hear Steve’s impassioned response now — and send him your own question or leave one in the comments here! freak.ws/34SnHC7
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Before the pandemic, Americans were commuting, on average, 54 minutes a day. How do people who transitioned to working from home spend all that saved commuting time? And what have been the larger effects of this year-long, work-from-home experiment? freak.ws/34J6tao
This week on our spinoff show @NSQ_Show: What changes will stick when the pandemic is gone? Also: would you take a confirmation-bias vaccine? freak.ws/3ioWzmb
Some employees are returning to offices and other workplaces. But not all. And for others — not ever. This week on Freakonomics Radio: what is to be learned from this sudden, mandatory, global work-from-home experiment? Listen now: freak.ws/3yZ9nFZ
Did you know ... the mayor of Philadelphia is named Jim Kenney, while the (acting) mayor of Boston is named Kim Janey. #AlmostPerfectSpoonerism.
Hear why @dambisamoyo claims that the more than $500 billion in foreign aid directed towards African countries over the last 50 years has actually hurt the continent — and why @BillGates described her book “Dead Aid” as “promoting evil.” freak.ws/34Nuayt
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“Working at home is always less productive than working in the office. Always.” — Morris Davis, @RutgersBSchool professor. Do you agree? Listen to this week’s episode for more: freak.ws/2SXQSkM
The pandemic ending doesn’t mean we’ll return to office full-time. The greatest accidental experiment in the history of labor has lessons to teach us about productivity, flexibility, and even reversing brain drain. But don’t buy more sweatpants just yet. freak.ws/3wRZh7Z
Before the pandemic, Americans were commuting, on average, 54 minutes a day. How do people who transitioned to working from home spend all that saved commuting time? And what have been the larger effects of this year-long, work-from-home experiment? freak.ws/2SQdkw1
Will Work-from-Home Work Forever? This week on Freakonomics Radio: freak.ws/3uNEmBC
Did you work from home during the past year? To what extent? Listen to this week’s episode to hear what experts are saying about this migration — and how others like you have been handling it. freak.ws/3ii7pum
This week, some goal-setting advice from grit queen @angeladuckw: “When we set goals, whether they are long-term, top-level goals or more modest goals, research says a helpful trick is to commit to them socially and publicly.” Listen now: freak.ws/3wIW7TK
Retweeted by Freakonomics
Some employees are returning to offices and other workplaces. But not all. And for others — not ever. This week on Freakonomics Radio: what is to be learned from this sudden, mandatory, global work-from-home experiment? Listen now: freak.ws/3fNQdv4
On this week’s episode of Freakonomics Radio: Are we really better off working from home? freak.ws/3fOGsNo
On this edition of the Freakonomics Radio Book Club, a master class in the science of persuasion with one of the world’s experts on the power of influence. Listen now: freak.ws/3vzQEys
In his best-seller “Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion,” Robert Cialidini identifies 7 key principles of persuasion that produce automatic, mindless compliance: a willingness to say yes without thinking first. Have you fallen for them? Find out: freak.ws/3yLorXC
“How do we feed almost 10 billion people by 2050 without lighting the planet on fire?” @GoodFoodInst founder @BruceGFriedrich says we already have the answer, on this week’s episode. Listen now to find out: freak.ws/34tUuO0
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This week on our spinoff show @NSQ_Show: Do you really need a muse to be creative? Also: is shortsightedness part of human nature? freak.ws/2SH8np6
Today there is an entire class of people who openly seek to be called “influencers.” So their intentions aren’t hidden — but how does it work? What makes someone a success at influencing others? That is where Dr. Robert Cialdini’s research comes in. freak.ws/3fvc5eI
“Social proof” — one of Robert Cialdini’s 7 principles of persuasion — is so powerful that people who watch a presidential debate on TV are significantly swayed by the magnitude and direction of the applause at the live event. Have you experienced this? freak.ws/2SCJxqm
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