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The Paris Review
The fade-out fades out, “Stop and Frisk: The Opera,” and other news bit.ly/1wlNSIB
“Because we live among so many unspoken boundaries that sometimes it’s a relief to have such an explicit one.” bit.ly/Z7d7Dn
“The actual turning point in my life was the voting of the Bollingen Prize to Ezra Pound.” —Karl Shapiro bit.ly/1APSJCr
“The only book in Sid and Sarah’s little house was the Bible, which they never read.” —Terry Southern bit.ly/1s2v4QB #fiction
“Mary’s heart was a watermelon that had been cut open, because the drops of blood were black like watermelon seeds.” bit.ly/1qCqBjB
“Specific hours of my childhood day would be tonally defined by what was on television.” —Chris Ware bit.ly/1uy3GXo
“If you cannot tell people of something they have not seen, it is hardly worthwhile to write at all.” —D. H. Lawrence bit.ly/1qI3W6V
Don’t miss the final installment of Rachel Cusk’s novel, “Outline.” Subscribe now to receive our Fall issue: bit.ly/1lbPrqJ
Before Rivka Galchen goes for Literary Death Match gold @SymphonySpace on 9/18, read this @parisreview interview: ow.ly/Buh5V
Retweeted by The Paris Review
“Only a novelist can know how neurotic, devious, underhanded a novelist can be.” —Walker Percy bit.ly/1nUVQmH
“Writing is the product of a deeply disturbed psyche, and by no means therapeutic.” —Edna O’Brien
M. Z. Ribalow, from “Vampire.” #Poetry in issue 64.
Terry Southern and George Plimpton on interviewing Henry Green and censorship: bit.ly/1wkzT5O
“I read in order to write. I read out of obsession with writing.” —Cynthia Ozick bit.ly/1qzw6Cb
“I learned as a divorce lawyer the importance of learning when to end the dialogue, when to cut the scene.” bit.ly/Xh7bGD
“Even Beckett, her god, had been destroyed by meaninglessness.” —Rachel Cusk bit.ly/Wp9Xcr #fiction
“I came to feel that punctuation was like nailing the words onto the page.” —W. S. Merwin bit.ly/Tcqnnw
“It would be nice if a Robert Frost or a William Faulkner were regularly produced at twenty-year intervals.” bit.ly/1tJMhdI
“The online world has more in common with medieval Norfolk than you might think.” bitly.com/WUY8Lg
“If you didn’t work as hard as the guy who runs a gas station then you had no right to hope for achievement.” bit.ly/1xVCOX4
“I’ve missed some very spectacular shots because I was needed during a bad storm or heavy fishing.” Corey Arnold, “Storm, Gulf of Alaska,” from “Fish-Work.” #Photography in issue 187.
“If the writer is really candid then it’s good autobiography, and if he’s not, then it’s nothing at all.” bit.ly/1ceTVpj
Sherwood Anderson; Clyde, Ohio; and the mythologies of small towns: bit.ly/1uAHJbe
“My earliest poems were a way of talking to somebody. I suppose to myself.” —Philip Levine bit.ly/1mgHyjW
“I became a writer because of frustration, the way I think many writers do.” —Doris Lessing bit.ly/1o7cceW
“The first sign is a need to talk to any stranger, until you see their eyes widen with fear and apprehension.” bit.ly/Zjzvth
“A writer works from the material she has, but it comes from the unconscious.” —Rosamond Lehmann bit.ly/1wo1GFi
“It would be impossible to find an actor who could play Ezra Pound.” —James Laughlin bit.ly/1rVSy3G
“Rather than constructing Dyson Spheres, advanced civilizations are more likely to spend their time getting high.” bit.ly/1wiIyFX
“Nobody can really know the future. But few could imagine it better than Stanisław Lem.” bit.ly/1wiIyFX
“I don’t think you can write a poem for more than two hours.” —Philip Larkin bit.ly/Ve5SY2
“A poem has secrets that the poet knows nothing of.” —Stanley Kunitz bit.ly/1tQjhET
This week’s staff picks: Ben Wheatley’s latest film, Margery Kempe on Twitter, and experiments with the longue durée bit.ly/WUY8Lg
“Sid and Sarah were of a line of unimaginative, one-acre farmers who very often had not owned the land they worked, and whose life’s spring was less connected to the proverbial love of the land than twisted somehow around a vague acceptance of work, God’s will and the hopeless, unsurprising emptines
“When you have finished reading, you should still be able to remember the beginning.” —Milan Kundera bit.ly/1m18FjT
The future according to writer Stanisław Lem: bit.ly/1wiIyFX
“The temptation to become the prophet is very great and very dangerous—it has to be resisted.” —Arthur Koestler bit.ly/1uLKTrT
“It cannot be denied: I am going mad.” @SadieStein on the perils of working from home and “going strange”: bit.ly/Zjzvth
Peter Schjeldahl, from “Alcohol.” #Poetry in issue 42.
“When I served my time, I used to jump rope, go for a jog, anything to forget the time.” —Atticus Lish bit.ly/1ua5wzt #fiction
“You did give me a rejection slip, I must say it wasn’t as nice as the one I got from The Atlantic.” —William Kennedy bit.ly/1qOvLcv
“People who write about dark things are not necessarily dark themselves.” —Lynne Tillman bit.ly/1pbCwBg
We have two free front-row tickets to Tuesday’s @LIVEfromtheNYPL event with Ben Lerner. Retweet by three p.m. EST today for a chance to win!
All American fiction is young-adult fiction, a million-word novel, and other news bit.ly/1win8sg
“Cheever and I sat up front in the car, excluded from Donleavy’s conversation about the evils of aspirin.” —Irving bit.ly/1rQrXLt
“Man is driven by evil instincts that are often stronger than moral laws.” —Eugene Ionesco bit.ly/1qIzVnp
“Dialogue in fiction is always written to be read in silence. The page is the limit.” —Guillermo Cabrera Infante bit.ly/1lYqCiX
From utility to poetry, Steve Greene’s supply catalog-infused art: bit.ly/1stV854
John Hollander on Auden: “A poet who could at once contain and indulge that basic impulse to play with words.” bit.ly/1tyYdRp