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The Paris Review
How much energy do you waste on boyfriends’ exes? bit.ly/1zW3qUf pic.twitter.com/5ubXVacbcG
In 1948, Richard Wright starred in this screen test for the film adaptation of “Native Son.” bit.ly/1DlrQqd pic.twitter.com/Pa9iurroH4
“The Song of The General,” by James Fenton bit.ly/1boVKnk pic.twitter.com/J2K2NpNI0R
How Caravaggio influenced the lighting design in “Better Call Saul.” bit.ly/1zQCaqe pic.twitter.com/L87x2ugcck
Here’s a piece from the archive for Anthony Trollope’s birthday! bit.ly/1Qpp1Pc pic.twitter.com/66suKg9D6O
Sixty-four years later, The Tales of Hoffmann continues to delight and perplex. bit.ly/1Dhu4qA pic.twitter.com/l5vD5SO5EO
Some images from the Folger Shakespeare Library. bit.ly/1Ex3j8T pic.twitter.com/oqigi7dJ3K
“I like meeting other writers, and Iowa City is a good place to meet them.” bit.ly/1HsKjJe pic.twitter.com/rFaUiB9bCF
Lawrence Lipton, from a portfolio of poems titled “Materia Poetica,” published in The Paris Review no. 19 (Summer 1958). #poetry #lawrencelipton #parisreview
“Whoreson cullionly barber-monger!” and other Shakespearean insults. bit.ly/1DFfolC pic.twitter.com/wvFo9DuIa1
How the lighting design in “Better Call Saul” was influenced by Caravaggio. bit.ly/1zQCaqe pic.twitter.com/cHlGl9F22Y
Madness and Meaning: how have we depicted insanity throughout history? bit.ly/1zMQekw pic.twitter.com/acxITdvdjn
F. Scott Fitzgerald reads a monologue from “Othello.” bit.ly/1AxjhZn pic.twitter.com/M2bYjoDVjK
How a gruesome legal case turned Voltaire into a crusader for the innocent. bit.ly/1bcaI0p pic.twitter.com/YgXWLTpPgw
Wordsworth's “Daffodils” celebrates its bicentennial this year. bit.ly/1FO6XpL pic.twitter.com/NQIpiaRtIk
“Clarence in the Seafood Palace,” by Elizabeth Handel. bit.ly/1bx10pH pic.twitter.com/hvesiGbSVw
Lori Nix’s dioramas in “Post Human Utopia.” bit.ly/1Jvzcg2 pic.twitter.com/ce0HiKgr1d
Marianne Moore, The Art of Poetry No. 4, interviewed by Donald Hall, published in The Paris Review no. 26 (Summer-Fall 1961). #writersatwork #mariannemoore #parisreview
Madness and Meaning: how have we depicted insanity throughout history? bit.ly/1zMQekw pic.twitter.com/HhEauwuRiH
Here's a picture from last night's event @BAM_Brooklyn of Lorin Stein in conversation with Chris Ware. @nationalbook pic.twitter.com/ry200Gq9ia