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The Paris Review
Impress your significant other this Valentine’s Day with vintage issues of The Paris Review: tpr.ly/1BExhnM pic.twitter.com/t4IAy7QMBp
Hugh Seidman, the first two stanzas of “After The Ear Inn After the Snow,” published in The Paris Review no. 100 (Summer/Fall 1986). #poetry #hughseidman #theearinn #parisreview
Maia Cruz Palileo, “Nochebuena,” 2013, showing now at Cuchifritos Gallery. More paintings: bit.ly/1tltAlr pic.twitter.com/9YTrkuPV0M
Impress your significant other this Valentine’s Day with vintage issues of The Paris Review: tpr.ly/1BExhnM pic.twitter.com/d0uKCbfpGy
Jack Kerouac, the Art of Fiction No. 41, interviewed by Ted Berrigan, Aram Saroyan, and Duncan McNaughton in The Paris Review no. 43 (Summer 1968). #writersatwork #kerouac #parisreview
Happy birthday, Virginia Woolf. Listen to the only known surviving recording of her voice: bit.ly/1utro6A pic.twitter.com/YQ3RSymdU7
Happy Birthday, Edith Wharton! Here’s an piece from our archive on “The Age of Innocence.” bit.ly/1BonEZb pic.twitter.com/o70JR0gBHL
Samuel Beckett, an excerpt from “How It Is,” published in The Paris Review no. 28 (Summer–Fall 1962). #fiction #samuelbeckett #parisreview
Need some weekend reading? Check out the latest recommendations from our staff: bit.ly/1D2K81x pic.twitter.com/0QDGy4Vite
The cover of The Paris Review no. 13 (Summer 1956), featuring an interview with Dorothy Parker and fiction by Nadine Gordimer. Many of our archival issues are still available for purchase on our Web site. #coverart #dorothyparker #nadinegordimer #parisreview
Valentine’s Day is coming up—show your affection with a special set of our vintage issues! bit.ly/15DVmiF pic.twitter.com/ydrLaaZZmh
“Crunchy” is about the materiality of material: tpr.ly/15lIWe5 pic.twitter.com/u9OfzfcdnX
Henry Miller, The Art of Fiction No. 28, interviewed by George Wickes in The Paris Review no. 28 (Summer–Fall 1962). #writersatwork #henrymiller #taboo #parisreview
On Valentine’s Day, say “I love you” with vintage issues of The Paris Review. tpr.ly/1BExhnM pic.twitter.com/OMUDgeWjbT
“I tried small doses of LSD in secluded tree and ocean cliff haven at Big Sur” —Allen Ginsberg tpr.ly/181hcxp pic.twitter.com/lZw5QM8GRk
The cover of @parisreview No. 39, Fall 1966, featuring e.e. cummings’ letters to Ezra Pound. tpr.ly/I9lExy pic.twitter.com/YXmnW53pnn
“lighght,” by Aram Saroyan, first a poem and later a print made for The Paris Review. Famously deemed “the most expensive word in history,” “lighght” caused a great deal of controversy in the 1970s following its inclusion in a poetry anthology edited by George Plimpton and sponsored by the National
“Re: LSD...” A lost letter from Allen Ginsberg to readers of The Paris Review circa 1966: bit.ly/1C4CNjJ pic.twitter.com/e36VxL9CLQ
Remembering “Flair,” a 1950s magazine so expensive to produce that it lasted only a year bit.ly/156vASZ pic.twitter.com/DkDSFTcQ6l
Found in our files: a letter from Allen Ginsberg about an acid trip involving LBJ bit.ly/1C4CNjJ pic.twitter.com/YWWelO7Qsj
Molly Russakoff, “Lament of the Conductor,” in The Paris Review no. 91 (Spring 1984). #poetry #lament #parisreview
Chaucer’s stink-filled writing studio, Malarkey in heaven, and Michel Houellebecq’s blues bit.ly/1ABXEGO pic.twitter.com/jfa89xTohy
Chinua Achebe on Martin Luther King’s legacy: “This is something we don’t often remember—how young [at age thirty-nine] he was cut down. But his achievement was such that those who lived to be a hundred didn't achieve half as much.” The audio is from an unused segment of Achebe’s Art of Fiction inte
The final entry in @MatteoPericoli’s “Windows on the World” series: Himeji City, Japan bit.ly/1CpYzfB pic.twitter.com/vMzmVG4Z2A
The first stanza of Geoffrey Hill’s “Pennies for Charon,” in The Paris Review no. 8 (Spring 1955). #poetry #geoffreyhill #parisreview