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metmuseum

Celebrate #KiteFlyingDay with this woodblock print created during Japan’s Edo period. met.org/1okXy7V
At 23, Vigée Le Brun was summoned to Versailles to paint Marie Antoinette (1755-1793), who was a few months younger than she. Three full-length life-size portraits of the queen are on view in “Vigée Le Brun: Woman Artist in Revolutionary France,” opening to the public on February 15. Elisabeth Louis
See The #MetBreuer before it opens to the public. #MetMembers Opening Week begins 3/8. Join: met.org/1SyfVTz
Today the Museum held a press preview for “Vigée Le Brun: Woman Artist in Revolutionary France,” opening to the public on February 15. An autodidact with exceptional skills as a portraitist, she achieved success in France and abroad during one of the most eventful, turbulent periods in European hist
"#VigéeLeBrun: Woman Artist in Revolutionary France" opens to the public on February 15. met.org/1mihiaD
In the 18th century, women artists typically practiced as pastelists before taking up oil painting. #VigeeLeBrun
Through Marie Antoinette, #VigéeLeBrun was admitted to the Académie Royale, becoming one of only four women members.
At 23, #VigéeLeBrun was summoned to Versailles to paint Marie Antoinette, who was a few months younger than she.
#VigéeLeBrun achieved success in France and abroad during one of the most turbulent periods in European history.
The 80 works on view are paintings and a few pastels from European and American collections. #VigéeLeBrun
This is the first retrospective and only the second exhibition devoted to #VigéeLeBrun in modern times.
#VigéeLeBrun is one of the finest 18th-century French painters and among the most important of all women artists.
We're tweeting from the "#VigéeLeBrun: Woman Artist in Revolutionary France" press preview. met.org/1mihiaD
This marble portrait head depicts Constantine the Great, the first Christian emperor of Rome met.org/1H6Mgwg
This drawing records actors performing “The Dirty Bride,” three days before #AshWednesday. met.org/1VWk0P8
The @SuperBowl kickoffs at 6:30 p.m. Learn about sports cards in the #BurdickCollection: met.org/1nN34iO
“When an artist is in love with the piece that communicates very well over time. So thousands of years later, we’re still feeling it.” —Arlene Shechet (@arleneshechet) on a bronze statuette of a veiled and masked dancer. Click the link in our profile to hear the sculptor discuss this Hellenistic wor
#ValentinesDay is one week away! Fall in love with our swoon-worthy @Pinterest board. met.org/1j5Hnb9
Works by Romare Bearden, Jacob Lawrence, & Faith Ringgold speak to the power of narrative. met.org/1TJqG4v
"Review: The Detailed, Rich and Mysterious Work of Jan van Eyck" —@nytimes on #MetvanEyck: met.org/1oao0Rm
Did you know it’s #BalletDay? The heavily impastoed surface suggests that Degas worked directly and extensively on this picture, building up passages of color with brushes and his fingers. Edgar Degas (French, 1834–1917). Dancers, Pink and Green, ca. 1890. #metmuseum #Degas
Ballet technique favors symmetry, balance, and the harmony of the entire body. met.org/1nMRQuH #BalletDay
 




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