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New York Times Books
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New Shortlist, Muses and Inspiration, includes novels featuring Hemingway, Shakespeare, Rembrandt and Freud. nyti.ms/1qOzW56
Vanessa Manko's "Invention of Exile" tells of an "epic love frustrated but never destroyed by political antagonism." nyti.ms/1tUJi3n
In "Your Face in Mine," Jess Row "has reached for satire as the mode to pick at the tough nut of racial identity." nyti.ms/1tUwH09
David Carr says the Britain in Nick Davies's "Hack Attack" is "less Jolly Olde England than a country gone mad." nyti.ms/1wPFwgm
In "The Way Forward," Paul Ryan opens up about his father's alcoholism and early death. Inside the List: nyti.ms/1vVotoU
In "Blue-Eyed Boy," Robert Timberg traces his journey from disfigured Vietnam veteran to author and journalist. nyti.ms/1vVmFfw
Rick Perlstein says Corey Robin and Heather Parton are the best writers on American politics today. By the Book: nyti.ms/1tUok4H
Geoff Nicholson's new novel, "The City Under the Skin," is "sometimes goofy, sometimes breezy, but always gripping." nyti.ms/1lm4Cyd
Vanessa Manko's "Invention of Exile" spans four decades and three continents to tell the story of an epic love. nyti.ms/1tUJ7oM
"Suspicious Minds" looks at the Truman Show delusion and other mental illnesses indicative of our time. nyti.ms/XZvfyJ
Bookends asks Mohsin Hamid and Thomas Mallon: Does where you live make a difference in how and what you write? nyti.ms/1tUNz6T
In the love letters between Christopher Isherwood and Don Bachardy, "cruelty is often the better part of honesty." nyti.ms/1lm5liO
In Open Book, a look at past reviews of the letters of Sylvia Plath, Flannery O'Connor and Saul Bellow. nyti.ms/1rF95yV
Pico Iyer reviews David Mitchell's "Bone Clocks." "No one, clearly, has ever told Mitchell that the novel is dead." nyti.ms/1tUnd56
Euny Hong's new book "explores the confluence of factors that make for Korea's pop-­cultural perfect storm." nyti.ms/1tUKjIT
Eddie Huang says, "it isn't Asian-Americans who need to come out of the shadows, it's the audience for their stories" nyti.ms/1qOyeRh
Richard Flanagan's "Narrow Road to the Deep North," about a brutal railway project, is "unforgiving and generous." nyti.ms/1qOxcVB
In her novel "Home Leave," Brittani Sonnenberg "writes about expatriate life with an easy authority." nyti.ms/XZBiU0
A celebrated British author embarks on a strange new career in linked novellas by Alessandro Baricco. nyti.ms/1rF7SaF
New Shortlist, Muses and Inspiration, has new books by Naomi Wood, Sally O'Reilly, Nina Siegal and Sheila Kohler. nyti.ms/1lm5wuw
David Carr reviews "Hack Attack," about a newspaper scandal: nyti.ms/1tUxoGF and discusses it on podcast: nyti.ms/1llXBNV
In "The Way Forward," Paul Ryan opens up about his father's alcoholism and early death. Inside the List: nyti.ms/1tUOiF5
In "Blue-Eyed Boy," Robert Timberg traces his journey from disfigured Vietnam veteran to author and journalist. nyti.ms/1wPS5bx
Jess Row's "Your Face in Mine" is a "provocative, intriguing" novel about a man who has racial reassignment surgery. nyti.ms/1llX6TY
Rick Perlstein suggests that Barack Obama read the Book of Job: "the world just isn't always a reasonable place." nyti.ms/1qOmZsa
David Mitchell, Jess Row, Vanessa Manko, Korean cool, hacking scandal at News of the World & much more in new issue: nyti.ms/1tUOGDC
"Doonesbury," "The Marxist Minstrels" and "Go, Dog. Go!" all make an appearance in Rick Perlstein's By the Book: nyti.ms/1wK4xJJ
Dwight Garner on the season's new football books - and an old favorite by a Pittsburgh Steeler: nyti.ms/1tPD5Wv
Pico Iyer reviews David Mitchell's "Bone Clocks." "No one, clearly, has ever told Mitchell that the novel is dead." nyti.ms/1tPtA9A
Bookends asks: Does where you live make a difference in how and what you write? Share your thoughts: nyti.ms/1qLbQs0
In "Powers of Two," Joshua Wolf Shenk challenges the notion of the lone genius. nyti.ms/1wE1Qth
New Bookends asks Mohsin Hamid and Thomas Mallon: Does where you live make a difference in how and what you write? nyti.ms/1ry8aQO
Michiko Kakutani on David Mitchell's "Bone Clocks": "dazzling and hogtied, genuinely moving and sadly unconvincing." nyti.ms/1onGXIH
"The Bone Clocks" shows David Mitchell's "heavy arsenal of talents," but is also "desperately in need of an editor." nyti.ms/1ARN40J
New Bookends asks Mohsin Hamid and Thomas Mallon: Does where you live make a difference in how and what you write? nyti.ms/1q2tQ4V
Michiko Kakutani on David Mitchell's "Bone Clocks": "dazzling and hogtied, genuinely moving and sadly unconvincing." nytimes.com/2014/08/27/boo…
Matthew Thomas's "We Are Not Ourselves" is "an honest, intimate family story with the power to rock you to your core" nyti.ms/1qHjTGg
David Mitchell says he's "sort of building . . . the 'uberbook' out of hyperlinked novels." nyti.ms/1rvp6Yd
This week, Bookends asks: Can writing be taught? Rivka Galchen and Zoë Heller discuss: nyti.ms/1q4DkfI
Vikram Chandra's "Geek Sublime," which looks deeply into technology and art, is "an unexpected tour de force." nyti.ms/1l2p7zZ
"Anyone who cares about American higher education should ponder" William Deresiewicz's "Excellent Sheep": nyti.ms/1q4A97D
Dana Goldstein surveys the history of American public education and suggests reforms in "The Teacher Wars": nyti.ms/1tupWSz
Vikram Chandra's "Geek Sublime," which looks deeply into technology and art, is "an unexpected tour de force." nyti.ms/1l2p3Ae
In "Excellent Sheep," William Deresiewicz portrays life at the Ivy League schools as "a bleak and soulless scene." nyti.ms/1p0SgMY
This week, Bookends asks: Can writing be taught? Rivka Galchen and Zoë Heller discuss: nyti.ms/1sdznUA
Reporters at The Times share their favorite books about education in this week's Open Book: nyti.ms/1AG4QUB
The latest New York Times best-seller lists: nyti.ms/1AG4jBX
Dana Goldstein surveys the history of American public education and suggests reforms in "The Teacher Wars": nyti.ms/1q4CKyo
Malala Yousafzai, By the Book: "I like writers who can show me worlds I know nothing about." nyti.ms/1tupm7j
Sandeep Jauhar's "Doctored" is an "arresting memoir about the realities of practicing medicine in America." nyti.ms/1odw0cJ